All along, Medical Marijuana advocates in Colorado have been on an intensive campaign to have cannabis approved for treatment of the post-traumatic stress disorder. This is the third time in a row; Colorado health officials have rejected the proposal presented to them after a 6-2 vote.

Already, nine states have already legalized cannabis as one of the prescriptions of PTSD and despite the rejection; Colorado’s chief medical officer, Dr. Larry Wolk and a panel of physicians had given their recommendations.

Wolk had argued that adding PSTD into the list of conditions treatable by Medical Marijuana would heighten the transparency between physicians and their patients. After all, many of these patients have been self-medicating with recreational marijuana to ease their pain.

Nevertheless, muscle spasms, epilepsy, cancer, severe nausea, and glaucoma are some of the conditions whose use of Medical Marijuana has been approved.

Reacting to the rejection, director of the Cannabis Patients Alliance, Teri Robnett, who is also a member of a board advisory panel, stated that the message by the health board members was clear. The welfare of patients did not matter to them anymore.

Further, a dozen of Cannabis veterans have not also taken the rejection kindly. Many of them have described how it has helped save their lives after the antidepressants, antipsychotics, opioids and other types of medication prescribed to them almost killed them.

But Tony Cappello, the president of the nine-member board would hear none these justifications. Cappello said that pot’s use for PTSD does not have any scientific evidence back up and the reason he refused to approve it. His sentiments had the echo of Dr. Ray Estacio, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

The Federal Policy has cited as the primary reason that has led to the scanty research over Medical Marijuana. This is according to Sue Sisley, a state-funded medical marijuana investigator and who has gone out of her way to look at the effects on veterans’ PTSD.

However, Sisley and her team says that their research could take a little longer; at least four years since Cannabis is still an illegal drug under federal law.